Woman shares emotional experience of how Tring-based Rennie Grove helped her dad as spring appeal is launched

“Hospice sounded so final… but once we’d been referred to Rennie Grove, gradually we realised that ‘hospice’ didn’t just mean end of life”
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Local resident Emma Welland is supporting Tring-based Rennie Grove’s spring appeal by sharing her experience of how the hospice supported her dad, and the whole family, to illustrate why more donations are desperately needed.

“Dad lived with cancer for almost two decades,” Emma said.

"He was diagnosed when I was just 16 years old. At first it was kept at bay through treatment and regular check-ups. But in March 2020 we received the devastating news that it was terminal.

Emma (left) with her mum, Andrea; sister, Sarah and dad, Dave. Emma (left) with her mum, Andrea; sister, Sarah and dad, Dave.
Emma (left) with her mum, Andrea; sister, Sarah and dad, Dave.

“It was an awful shock to hear those words. That the time had come to stop the treatment, discharge Dad, and refer him to his local hospice service. We were distraught. ‘Hospice’ sounded so final. We weren’t ready for that. And surely Dad wasn’t either? 

“But once we’d been referred to Rennie Grove, gradually we realised that ‘hospice’ didn’t just mean end of life. What it meant for Dad was the chance to keep living his life the way he wanted to, for as long as possible.

“By the start of 2022, Dad was getting very frail. The Rennie Grove nurses were visiting multiple times a day now to help with pain relief. They talked to Dad and to us about Peace Hospice, where 24-hour specialist care would help keep him more comfortable towards the end. Dad agreed – and the nurses managed that transition seamlessly.

“He was made to feel so welcome when he arrived at Peace Hospice. We could see he immediately felt at ease there. And that is where he spent his final hours, with us by his side.

Emma (left) with her mum, Andrea; sister, Sarah and dad, Dave. Emma (left) with her mum, Andrea; sister, Sarah and dad, Dave.
Emma (left) with her mum, Andrea; sister, Sarah and dad, Dave.

“What was so brilliant about all the hospice care we had was that everyone always put Dad first. They spoke to him, listened to him and involved him in decisions about his medication and care.

“I’d hate to think of families going through a similar experience without the expert, compassionate help we had on hand from Rennie Grove 24/7.”

Caroline Allen, Assistant Director of Community Hospice at Home at Rennie Grove, says: “For Dave, staying out of hospital was paramount. As was maintaining a sense of control over his condition, right until the end. His family says our nurses gave him just that. We couldn't do this without the generous support of our local communities and we’re asking people to support our spring appeal so we can continue to be there for people like Dave.”As a charity, Rennie Grove rrely heavily on the generous support of the public.

"So, we have a duty to use your kind donations wisely and well,” the charity says.

"Making sure we’re as efficient as possible and always delivering the best possible care for every patient… We focus our strategic activities in three major areas: efficiency, engagement, and improvement. In short, we work across the charity to make sure your support is put to the best use possible. In other words, helping more people live well for as long as possible, with the choice to die at home.”

To find out more or donate today, visit the website.

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