Big-hearted loveable mastiff Nina is looking for her forever home in Hertfordshire

Watch more of our videos on Shots! 
and live on Freeview channel 276
Visit Shots! now
Five-year-old mastiff Nina has been patiently waiting for a new home since arriving at the Southridge Animal Centre in November 2022.

An appeal to find her a home comes after the RSPCA released figures which show it takes twice as long to rehome big dogs as smaller breeds.

Some of the RSPCA’s longest serving residents are large breed dogs with the cost of living crisis putting people off from adopting big dogs.

Hide Ad
Hide Ad

But staff say adopting a dog is one of the most rewarding experiences you can have and recommend adopting a rescue, like Nina.

Five-year-old mastiff Nina has been patiently waiting for a new home since November 2022Five-year-old mastiff Nina has been patiently waiting for a new home since November 2022
Five-year-old mastiff Nina has been patiently waiting for a new home since November 2022

A spokesperson at Southridge Animal Centre, said: “Nina may be a big girl at 50kg (110lbs) but she’s also got a big heart; she’s very sweet and loves affection from the people she knows and trusts. You soon become her best friend after some fun games with her favourite toys and some treats.

“She walks nicely on the lead but can be strong and sometimes reactive around certain other dogs. Her history is unknown so staff feel she’d be best going to an adult home where she’ll be the only pet."

The RSPCA, which celebrates its 200th birthday this year, says figures show that, on average, it takes 33 days to rehome small dogs and 39 days to rehome medium-sized dogs, compared to 60 days to rehome large dogs.

Hide Ad
Hide Ad

Alaskan malamutes wait longest of all - with the average time to rehome them in RSPCA care currently standing at a staggering 257 days.

Clinical Animal Behaviourist and RSPCA Dog Welfare Expert Esme Wheeler said: “At the RSPCA we love all creatures, great and small. And as a nation of dog lovers, we all adore our dog pals whether they’re as big as a horse or as small as a guinea pig.

“But there can be some differences between taking care of gentle giants and cheeky miniatures when it comes to their day-to-day needs - so it’s important to take time as a family to consider what type and size of dog might suit your lifestyle, and what costs will be associated with their care.

“Taking on any dog is a huge commitment, in terms of both time and money, so it’s really important to go into it with your eyes open as to how much it could cost. However, adopting a dog is one of the most rewarding experiences you can have so if you’re thinking of getting a pet, then please consider adopting a rescue.”

Click here for more details about Nina or how to contact Southridge Animal Centre.

Related topics: