Console Corner: The Ninja Saviors Return of the Warriors review

A love letter to 80s and 90s gaming.

Monday, 2nd September 2019, 3:20 pm
Updated Monday, 2nd September 2019, 4:20 pm
Ninja Saviors Return of the Warriors is a love letter to 80s and 90s gaming

Gamers of the 80s and 90s will remember the beat-em-up classic Ninja Warriors, well now it has been reinvented for Nintendo Switch and PS4.

Ninja Saviors: The Return of the Warriors was released last week and immediately grabbed my attention.

I don’t know if it is because my daughter starts secondary school this week or whether the Switch has rekindled the gaming joy of my youth but I have found myself increasingly drawn to retro nostalgic gaming of late.

Ninja Saviors Return of the Warriors is a love letter to 80s and 90s gaming

So this remaster of the 1994 SNES classic, which itself was a console port of the 1987 arcade game, was right up my street.

And it did not disappoint.

The plot - for those new to the game - is prime 80s/90s beat-em-up.

In a dystopian future, the world is dominated by a dictatorial regime ruled by a dwarfish mutant creature who calls himself Banglar the Tyrant.

Ninja Saviors Return of the Warriors is a love letter to 80s and 90s gaming

Banglar commands an army of brainwashed human soldiers, vicious mutants and non-sentient combat robots.

It is up to you to restore order. And you have a choice of five very different characters to help you do just that.

Ninja is a hulking tank armed with nunchucks perfect for steaming through hordes of bad guys.

The more lithe Kunoichi offers a more agile playing style and deadly jump attacks.

Ninja Saviors Return of the Warriors is a love letter to 80s and 90s gaming

Kamaitachi boasts a scythe and speed of attack. There are also another two additional characters to choose from in ROTW in the form of Yaksha - a very short female ninja with extending arms - and Raiden, who is a colossal mechanised shinobi ninja robot. NSROTW features enhanced graphics as you would expect but also adds new gameplay elements.

There is 16:9 widescreen support, local two-player co-op mode and a rather cool option to select music from the arcade and SNES games.

The crowning achievement, though, is the depth to the combat. If beat-em-ups from the 80s and 90s died a death in the noughties it was solely down to a lack of depth. Button mashing became a thing of the past and the repetitive nature of these side-scrolling fighting games quickly became old hat.

In NSROTW, though, there is a quite frankly unbelievable amount of depth to the combat, to the point I’m not even sure I have fully discovered all the moves and combos yet and I’ve been playing solidly for over a week.

Ninja Saviors Return of the Warriors is a love letter to 80s and 90s gaming

I have been playing on the Switch and it has been great having a game that is excellent both docked and in handheld mode.

NSROTW is competitively priced (£16.99 digital download) and if you want to immerse yourself in some genuine top class nostalgic action, look no further, it won’t let you down.

Ninja Saviors Return of the Warriors is a love letter to 80s and 90s gaming
Ninja Saviors Return of the Warriors is a love letter to 80s and 90s gaming