Fake lottery ‘winner’ from Kings Langley ordered to pay back more than £900,000

Following his conviction a further investigation to identify and confiscate his assets under the Proceeds Of Crime Act was undertaken by ERSOU

By Holly Patel
Wednesday, 26th January 2022, 5:04 pm

A convicted fraudster from Kings Langley who conned Camelot out of £2.5 million after presenting a fake lottery ticket has been ordered to pay back £939,000.

In October 2019, 56-year-old Edward Putman, from Station Road, was sentenced to serve nine years in prison following his conviction of fraud by false representation.

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Following his conviction a further investigation to identify and confiscate his assets under the Proceeds Of Crime Act was undertaken by specialist Financial Investigators at the Eastern Region Special Operations Unit (EROSU).

After a hearing St Albans Crown Court today (Wednesday, January 26), His Honour Judge Grey confirmed that Putman had benefitted by £2,525,495 - and ordered him to repay £939,782.44.

This was the total value of assets that were still available.

And if Putman does not repay this amount in three months he will serve a further six years in prison.

The assets consist of a large residential property, vehicles, a static caravan and funds held in bank accounts.

And if further realisable assets are identified, the Confiscation Order will be adjusted to take these into account until all his benefit is repaid.

Putman claimed the £2.5m lottery prize in 2009, but it wasn’t until 2015 that an investigation was opened by Hertfordshire Constabulary after evidence came to light that the claim was not genuine.

Putman was arrested in October 2015, but he denied being involved, and the matter was discontinued due to lack of evidence. The original ticket submitted by Putman could not be found.

But the ticket was later discovered in January 2017 by Camelot staff, and the investigation reopened - leading to his conviction.

Financial Investigator Claire Howard said: “This case demonstrates our commitment to continue to use Proceeds Of Crime Act powers at every opportunity, in order to strip the assets from those who seek to benefit from illegal activity.

"We will continue to work tirelessly to ensure those involved in all forms of acquisitive crime do not benefit from it.”