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Challenge Yourself: Umming and ahhing about becoming a volunteer? We’ve got all your questions answered

Andrew Leithboro who spoke about his experience of being an IT volunteer at the AGM

Andrew Leithboro who spoke about his experience of being an IT volunteer at the AGM

  • by Lorraine Rockminster, Volunteer Dacorum
 

What could I do? How many hours would I have to do? What sort of people volunteer? Are any special skills needed? What is expected of volunteers? Will I be offered training and support? What’s in it for you? Find out.

What could I do as a volunteer?

This week, there are 300 different ways you could help in your community; anything from befriending, buddying, conservation, catering, driving, fundraising, IT and packing to probation work.

How many hours would I have to do?

It is up to you to decide. Volunteers typically offer one or two half days each week.

Some organisations use a rota system so would need you to do a regular weekly slot but others are totally flexible.

Some organisations ask for a commitment of at least six months but there are some that are happy to take volunteers for shorter periods.

What sort of people volunteer?

Volunteering can be for anyone regardless of age, ability or walk of life. At our centre, we help more people between the ages of 15 and 25 years to volunteer than any other age group. Some roles have a minimum age limit but there are lots that don’t.

Are any special skills needed?

No, common sense is more important for most roles. If you’re friendly, reliable and enjoy a new challenge volunteering could be for you.

What is expected of volunteers?

Volunteers usually support paid staff in their work. In general they should be on time and work the hours they agreed to, follow advice and directions from their supervisor and be willing to undertake training if necessary.

Will I be offered training 
and support?

Most organisations offer induction training and ongoing support as a minimum.

Others have specific training courses for you to follow so that you become confident in your new role.

What’s in it for you?

With volunteering there is the chance to make new friends, improve your employability, learn new skills and give something back to your community.

It will also improve your confidence as you take on a new challenge and of course, have fun.

What next?

Call in at the Roundhouse and see how Volunteer Centre Dacorum can help you into your new volunteer role.

 

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